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Discover nature – 8 birds you can spot in Brighton and Hove

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BIRDS are all around us in the streets, our garden and in parks.

Here in Brighton and Hove we have numerous seagulls and the evening delight of starlings flocking around the pier at night, writes Sarah Booker Lewis.

Even tiny babies can delight at spotting the birds flying around, so why not join in the RSPB’s Big Garden Birdwatch this weekend (January 28-30).

You will be amazed by what you children might spot close to home.

Count them, look at the colours, can you sing their song?

Here are eight birds you are likely to see in Brighton and Hove.

Herring gulls

Herring Gull, image by Scottmliddell, licenced by Creative Commons

Herring Gull, image by Scottmliddell, licenced by Creative Commons

Can you make a noise like a seagull?

These seem to be the most numerous gulls in the city. You may have one nesting on the roof come spring.

They have grey wings with black tips and pink legs.

If a gull has yellow legs and darker wings, you are lucky enough to see a lesser black back. They look very similar.

Pied wagtails

Pied Wagtail, image by Keven Law licenced by Creative Commons

Pied Wagtail, image by Keven Law licenced by Creative Commons

See how the bird bobs and runs.

Ever spotted a tiny black and white bird with a long tail?

These delicate birds can be seen dashing around the streets searching for insects, chirping as they go.

As they scurry along the ground their long tails bob up and down.

Blackbirds

Male common blackbird. Image by Stuutje1979, licenced by Creative Commons

Male common blackbird.
Image by Stuutje1979, licenced by Creative Commons

See how yellow his beak and eyes are.

Male blackbirds have luscious dark plumage and bright yellow beaks while the females are brown.

These members of the thrush family are relatively common but their numbers are dwindeling.

Come summer the boys like to sit on roofs singing their hearts out.

Starling

A pair of starlings

A pair of starlings

Listen to the noise they make. See how they fly together.

Brighton is known for its starlings swooping around the pier.

These speckled birds are mimics with a raspy song.

House sparrow

Male and female house sparrows at a bird feeder. Picture by Matt MacGillivray, licenced by Creative Commons

Male and female house sparrows at a bird feeder. Picture by Matt MacGillivray, licenced by Creative Commons

How many can you count?

One of Britain’s most common garden birds.

Female house sparrows are brown while the males have grey heads and black markings over their eyes and on their chests.

Blue tit

A blue tit. Image by Francis C. Franklin, licenced by Creative Commons

A blue tit.
Image by Francis C. Franklin, licenced by Creative Commons

A colourful blue bird.

These tiny little acrobats hop around the trees feeding on insects.

Listen out for their tiny chirps.

You can see blue tits in gardens in the city centre, as well as parks around town.

Wren

A wren, one of Britain's smallest birds. Image by Dave Curtis, licenced by Creative Commons

A wren, one of Britain’s smallest birds. Image by
Dave Curtis, licenced by Creative Commons

Gulls are big and wrens are tiny.

A great teaching tool to help children learn comparisons.

A tiny bird with a massive voice, wrens look like little balls.

Its tail standing up at an almost 90 degree angle, gives this tiny brown bird a distinctive silhouette.

Robin

A European robin. Image by Francis C. Franklin, licenced by Creative Commons

A European robin. Image by Francis C. Franklin, licenced by Creative Commons

Look at the red Robin!

Such an exciting bird to find in your garden.

Robins are often known as the gardener’s friend, as they will come quite close to you.

They like to forrage in freshly dug earth for the insects they feed on.

Robins are very territorial with a loud singing voice.

Have fun spotting and counting birds.

You never know what else you may discover.

 

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